exhibitions

current

27.jpg 16.03.2018 - 16.05.2018

Alexander Vinogradov Città Ideale

Galerie Iragui presents, “Città Ideale”, the first solo exhibition of celebrated Russian painter Alexander Vinogradov at the gallery. The exhibition takes cue from the eponymous unattributed Renaissance paintings, as a blueprint for the shift from the medieval town to the modern city: geometric patterns, abstract criteria and scientific approaches, often riddled with utopian tension. For Vinogradov, born and raised in the Moscow of the second half of the twentieth century, this ideal city is the new Moscow: A city that was destroyed and re-built for the monumental architecture of the future, and the Great Utopia.

 

At the heart of the exhibition, major unfinished and unrealized architectural projects from the Soviet period, are showcased by the artist in a new series of drawings, depicting present day's Moscow with its capitalist shock-culture, but in an alternative utopian future. The “Città Ideale” project is complemented with two painterly gestures: The abstraction of images in the course of a journey in between different cities in Russia, and some works from the earlier series, depicting modern life in Italy, in high socialist realist style, almost passing a satirical examination on late capitalist culture.

 

After several decades living and working in Moscow as a part of the Dubossarsky Vinogradov duo, the artist relocated to Italy, and painting solo, where distance from the tumultuous everyday life of the city, has become an inward gaze: The reconstruction of a future ideal Moscow, is also deconstruction. All memory has already become partly fiction, situated in the indeterminate space between utopia and propaganda. Vinogradov's roots in figuration, also reveal paradox: Running against the conceptualism of the 1990s, is it possible to depict reality at all without its boundaries collapsing?

 

At moments, the reconstruction of the city is not only historical-physical but also emotional-psychic, how could the destiny of this city be changed or averted? In 1927, Walter Benjamin traveled to revolutionary Moscow, and jotted down a diary of his impressions of urban life under the conditions of modernity -monumental architecture beyond human scale, a 19th century dream from which 'we must awake'. A dialogue on Benjamin's text leads to unexpected archaeological findings on the  field of the future, understanding the tension of utopia as a longing for a remote, infinite, ever-recurring past.    

 

Arie Amaya-Akkermans 

 

past

11.01.2018 - 10.03.2018

Wild Flowers (wildness is contextual!) – Volume II (grow flowers!)

Galerie Iragui is pleased to present Wild Flowers (wildness is contextual!) - volume II (Grow Flowers!) curated by Carlos Noronha Feio. The exhibition brings together work by thirteen international artists from different generations who work in a number of different
mediums. Each work chosen by Noronha Feio for the show examines the motif of the
flower.

This exhibition has its origins in Noronha Feio's interest in flora as a representation of
power. On the surface of the show, the naïve and sentimental aesthetic value of the
flower presents itself as a deceptive cover over the deeper conceptual research that the
works truly look into. For example, Marte Eknæs’ video Rainbow Rose, 2012, shows an alternative use for 3D modeling software that was until recently primarily used by the military. Neil Haas’ blind sculptural painting presents us with flowers as counterbalance to his studies of young male streetwise forms of masculinity. Harm van den Dorpel’s work is not touched by his hand, it is rather produced as a consequence of software, algorithms, van den Dorpel devises. Albuquerque Mendes presents what is perhaps the most classical work in the exhibition, a canvas of sunflowers from a series titled The Silly Paintings, where Mendes alludes to the work of other artists, through subtle variations in the mode of painting the elements of the composition in each work of the series. The title of Volume II of this exhibition is in itself an allusion to the beautifully crafted ambiguity of Poem about Flowers by Soviet nonconformist Genrikh Sapgir (1928-1999).

At galerie Iragui, Noronha Feio’s Wild Flowers present several artists that require no local introduction: Olga Chernysheva, Nikita Alexeev, Georgy Litichevsky, and the younger Ilya Dolgov are house hold names that in this exhibition are contrasted with artists such as Lulou Margarine, Daniel van Straalen and Dan Mitchell.

This is an exhibition that has flowers as its core, as its leitmotif, a recurring visual that plays with beauty to present the artists different identities, subjectivities and interests. 

Artist list

Nikita Alexeev (b. 1953 lives and works in Moscow, Russia)
Olga Chernysheva (b.1962 lives and works in Moscow, Russia)
Ilya Dolgov (b. 1984 lives and works in Kronshtadt, Russia)
Harm van den Dorpel (b. 1981 lives and works in Berlin)
Marte Eknæs (b. 1978 lives and works in Norway)
João Ferro Martins (b.1979 lives and works in Lisbon, PT)
Neil Haas (b. 1971 lives and works London, UK)
Georgy Litichevsky (b. 1956 lives and works in Moscow, Russia and Berlin, Germany)
Lulou Margarine (b. 1984 lives and works in New York, USA)
Albuquerque Mendes (b.1953 lives and works in Porto, PT)
Dan Mitchell (b.1966 lives and works in London, UK)
Carlos Noronha Feio (b. 1981 lives and works in London, UK and Lisbon, PT)
Daniel van Straalen (b. 1987 lives and works in The Hague, Netherlands)